Berlin’s Cold War Footprints

Berlin is a beautiful and vibrant place with secrets around every corner. Unfortunately, mere days aren’t enough to explore what secrets it hides. My adoration of Berlin has no end, and I cannot wait to go there again.

When most people think of Berlin, people think of World War II.

I wrote in my review of Deutschland 83 that the world seems to ignore that between the fall of Nazi Germany and now, that Germany has a history which plagues it to this day: its place in the Cold War. The devisor between the East and West, the divide could not be any more obvious as the streets are marked with bricks to indicate where the Wall of Shame divided the world.

But it isn’t just the brickwork which marks where the Wall used to be. One only has to look around them to see the obviousness of this divide. Post-War West Berlin was rebuilt to assume what had been destroyed with classical, neo-classical and bauhaus architecture, and even in 2015, remains very much under construction with empty plots of land in the middle of the city. East Berlin was not so lucky; Soviet architecture’s emphasis upon classlessness and mass production resulted in a lack of uniqueness for monolithic and brutalist housing. None of Stalin’s great architecture seemed to transfer to East Berlin, with government buildings seemingly immersed in amongst residential blocks.

It is lucky that the Berlin Wall has not become as touristic as other locations, despite people desperately peddling pieces of painted cement for a few Euros each. The Berlin Wall left behind not only architecture, but victims, and wherever you walk in Berlin, you see remnants of the lives it took. Whether it’s the Stasi Prison, or the crosses by the river, you cannot simply walk past it without knowing what it left behind.

Here are some photos of Cold War Berlin!

Next posts will be about Hohenschönhausen Stasi Prison (Cold War) and the Centre for German Resistance Movements (WW2).

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